The city of Coca, in the Segovia Province part of the autonomous region of Castilla-Leon, is a small town north-west of Madrid hosting an amazing medieval castle.

The city is located at about 140 km from the capital, just a few kilometers off  the main highway connecting Madrid and Valladolid.  An alternate way is to drive from Segovia, another great destination. Coca is north-west of Segovia at about an hour drive. This alternate route can make for a nice loop (Madrid-Segovia-Coca) if you plan to visit Segovia, a must stop in the cities to visit north of Madrid.

Coca features an impresive medieval castle that takes the name of the town, Coca Castle. Built in the second half of the 15th century (around 1493) it is one of the most important castles in Spain from this era and a unique castle not only is Spain but throughout Europe.

Coca Castle overview

Coca Castle overview

As you may note from the pictures, the castle is built of bricks in the Mudejar style. The castle is built in a sandy and wooded land poor in stone. The castle is not Islamic in plan or disposition despite its brick construction but rather Christian.  Built by Don Alfonso Fonseca, Archbishop of Segovia.

Coca Castle south-east view

Coca Castle south-east view

The castle is built as three “concentric rings”,  figuratively speaking “rings” since it is actually a rectangular structure.  The outer structure featuring four corners with polygonal towers that rise from the bottom of the moat.

Coca Castle polygonal tower.

Coca Castle polygonal tower.

These polygonal towers emerge from a huge and deep moat that is about 40 feet deep. The moat appears to me as being man made. There are two draw bridges to access the castle, I have included pictures of both.

Coca Castle defending wall

Coca Castle defending wall

Here you can  see the second “ring” of extremely strong walls that make the main part of the castle. This also feature polygonal and round towers. You can climb the outer defending wall in the back and get a feel of the warfare this place may have endured.

Coca Castle defending walls and moat

Coca Castle defending walls and moat

There were two draw bridges, one is in use today as the main access to the castle. The other one is a standing column that would have help the bridge. You may note this remnant in one of the pictures. The main draw bridge is in great condition and is the main access to the structure. Crossing the main draw bridge leads you to the outer court yard.

Coca Castle moat and main entrance

Coca Castle moat and main entrance

Once in the outer court yard you can walk around the entire structure, climb the defending walls or go through some interesting passages as you navigate your way to the entrance of the main tower. To gain access to the main tower, now used as a school, there is a set of door, one being a medieval style drop door.

Coca Castle main structure entrance

Coca Castle main structure entrance

I like to include pictures of the landscape surrounding this beautiful towns and interesting featues found along the way. During my drive, a long loop north of Madrid visiting town after town the prevailing scene is included in this blog.

Segovia Province landscape on the way to Coca

Segovia Province landscape on the way to Coca

An interesting feature of this region is the number of stork’s nests, found in just about ever tall structure, literately in very town I visited. In this blog is one found in Coca.

Nesting storks

Nesting storks